Practice areas

Conflict, climate and resilience

The effects of climate change have an impact on conflict, security and fragility. Often those who are most vulnerable and marginalised live in conflict-affected regions that are more likely to suffer from environmental shocks and stresses. 1.5 billion people today live in conflict-affected states and the violent conflict often reverses gains made towards achieving the sustainable development goals. MannionDaniels works with donors and organisations to address the root causes of conflict and vulnerability to climate change, such as lack of climate-smart livelihoods, empowerment and improved rights of women, girls and people with disabilities as well as inequitable policy processes.

We take a conflict-sensitive approach, working closely both with grass roots organisation to promote community-led solutions and local level decision makers to strengthen institutions and the enabling environment. Our work to date has supported projects in the Sahel, North East Nigeria, the Horn of Africa and North East Kenya.

 

Topic areas covered

  • Adaptive management for protracted crises
  • Political economy analysis
  • Strengthening responses to emerging conflict and local-level crises through conflict mitigation and prevention activities
  • Climate adaptation
  • Resilient livelihoods strengthening
  • Social protection
  • Local government capacity building.

Case Study: Mandate and stakeholder mapping for the Presidential Committee on the North-East Initiative

The Presidential Committee on the North East Initiative (PCNI) was set up to coordinate the work of the very many state and non-state organisations involved in rebuilding the fragile states in north-eastern Nigeria under the ambitious plan developed by the Nigerian Federal Government in 2016. The plan included reconstruction of infrastructure and socio-economic rehabilitation to boost stability, resilience and long-term sustainable development.

Project map

See where we’re currently working to strengthen PFM systems